Based on feedback from 25 major high street brands, the latest 'Let's Clean Up Fashion' report from rights group Labour Behind the Label grades the firms between zero and five based on their progress towards implementing a living wage.

Zero means there is no living wage principle in place; while a rating of 5 shows a company is meeting Labour Behind the Label's demands for an effective living wage policy that is applied across their entire supply chains.

None of the retailers surveyed scored higher than 3.5, but here's how they fared:

Grade 3.5: Can offer concrete examples of steps to develop and implement a living wage methodology in the supplier base, with clear plans to move beyond pilot projects

Grade 3.0: Can offer concrete examples of steps to increase wages in the supplier base, but there are either significant omissions or there is no clear plan to move beyond pilot projects

Grade 2.5: Can offer concrete examples of steps to increase wages in the supplier base, but pilot projects are limited in scope and have significant omissions

  • Arcadia Group (Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Evans, Miss Selfridge, Topman, Topshop, Wallis, and operationally BHS)
  • Aurora Fashions (Oasis, Warehouse, Karen Millen, Coast, Odille and Anoushka G)
  • Burberry
  • Tesco

Grade 2: Acknowledges that minimum and industry benchmark wages are not sufficient standards, but no real efforts to apply living wage

Grade 1: Accepts the principle of a living wage, but applies legal minimum/industry benchmark

Grade 0: Does not accept the principle of a living wage