According to Applied DNA Sciences, some manufacturers are known to substitute cheaper fibres

According to Applied DNA Sciences, some manufacturers are known to substitute cheaper fibres

The development of an Applied DNA Sciences' authentication test has resulted in the seizure of over US$1m worth of mislabelled textiles.

The DNA-based authentication and security solutions and service from biotechnology firm Applied DNA Sciences was recently used to interdict a shipment of mislabelled textiles. The products comprised an assortment of yarn, finished fabric and garments that could have been mislabelled, and subsequently, marketed and sold in retail outlets in the US and globally.

According to Applied DNA Sciences, some manufacturers are known to substitute cheaper fibres during the spinning of yarn and the weaving of fabric in order to increase margins. However, it lowers product quality, durability, colour fastness, texture and even safety.

Presently, US and European fibre producers do the majority of their manufacturing off-shore, and there have been no methods to affirm label compliance until APDN's patented DNA methods.

Applied DNA Sciences believes no other taggant can match the information content, and forensic assurance of DNA.

"We are proud to say that Applied DNA Sciences can protect textile retailers, brand owners, buyers of fine fabrics and their suppliers and consumers from the tricks that are not revealed until the second or third wearing, as the product begins to fail. Our methods empower law enforcement organizations such as US Customs and Border Protection. We see a new world with improved textile quality, globally," said Dr. James Hayward, president and CEO of APDN.