The EU Ecolabel is a voluntary label promoting environmental excellence

The EU Ecolabel is a voluntary label promoting environmental excellence

The European Commission (EC) has set out the criteria for awarding the EU Ecolabel to textile and clothing products, which covers hazardous chemicals, recycled content, energy efficiency and water management.

The EU Ecolabel is intended to identify items that have a reduced environmental impact along their entire lifecycle, from raw materials through to production, use and disposal.

As well as fibres, yarn and fabric, the rules also include zips, buttons, membranes, coatings and laminates.

To be awarded the Ecolabel, manufacturers must ensure that products do not contain hazardous substances found in restricted substance lists (RSL).

Only where a substance is required to meet consumer performance expectations or mandated requirements for the product (such as flame retardancy), and where there are no applied and tested available alternatives, will the Ecolabel be granted.

Strict conditions are also imposed on the manufacturing processes for textiles to control pollution of water and air, and to minimise exposure of the workforce.

In addition, where required, laboratory testing based on random sampling must be carried out for each product line.

The EU Ecolabel is a voluntary label promoting environmental excellence, that was established in 1992. The EC says it has set out the criteria for textile products as they have the most potential to reduce environmental impacts.

Click on the following link to read the full text of the Commission decision: Ecological criteria for the award of the EU Ecolabel for textile products.