For every ten Denali jackets produced, enough fabric scrap is created to produce another four jackets

For every ten Denali jackets produced, enough fabric scrap is created to produce another four jackets

VF-owned outdoor brand The North Face has incorporated three of Unifi's Repreve environmentally friendly materials into its Denali line of fleece jackets, significantly reducing the amount of water and chemicals used in the fabric dyeing and finishing process.

Black and heather grey Denali jackets made with Repreve's WaterWise yarn with colour technology use 50% less water, 50% less chemicals and 25% less energy in the fabric dyeing and finishing process, according to The North Face.

The brand is also incorporating Repreve's recycled yarn and Repreve Textile Takeback yarn made from fabric scraps and recycled bottles in the Denali jackets.

To further reduce waste, cut fabric waste from Denali jacket production is collected and sent to Unifi's Repreve Recycling Center in North Carolina where it is recycled into Repreve Takeback yarn. This, along with yarn made from recycled plastic bottles, is then knit into new fabric for Denali jackets. Typically, about 15% of fabric used in garment production is cut out and discarded in the process.

This programme creates a loop of material reprocessing and gives new purpose to a major waste stream. For every ten Denali jackets produced, enough fabric scrap is created to produce another four jackets, The North Face says.

"We are always looking for innovative ways to make better products and minimise our environmental impact,” explains Adam Mott, director of sustainability at The North Face. “This partnership with Unifi's Repreve technology allowed us to eliminate waste in our manufacturing and significantly reduce the water and energy required to make one of our most iconic products, the Denali jacket."

Jay Hertwig, vice president of global brand sales and marketing for Unifi, adds: "At Unifi, we continue to expand the process for making Repreve, engineering new ways to recycle materials throughout the supply chain.”