Blog: Leonie BarrieA different game of ‘tag’

Leonie Barrie | 26 July 2004

Japanese authorities have decided that tagging kids with RFID chips is the best way to protect them. The chips will be put onto kids' schoolbags, name tags or clothing and their movements will be tracked by strategically-placed readers. The tags being trialled are similar to those used for inventory control on merchandise at retailers and wholesalers – and as one reader on the Japan Today website puts it: “The morning register will become a stock inventory.”

Of course safety is of paramount importance in this day and age, but there’s a real danger too that a whole generation will grow up without a basic knowledge of common sense safety. I grew up with slogans like "Be smart, be safe!"; "Clunk Click Every Trip!"; and of course the Green Cross Code (which still seems to be part of the UK government’s soberingly-named ‘Arrive Alive’ campaign).

And what about the various campaigns aimed at putting a stop to RFID technology altogether? Will they decide the benefits outweigh the disadvantages when it comes to children’s safety and relax their stance on using the tags on humans?


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