Blog: Leonie BarrieMonthly sales reports lose further weight

Leonie Barrie | 5 October 2012

When we launched just-style's 'Retail Roundup' column a decade ago, 22 US apparel and footwear retailers reported their monthly same-store sales results. As of next year, that number will drop to just 14, after discount giant Target Corp said it will no longer file monthly numbers.

The company's rationale is that the move is consistent with the vast majority of its retail peers - most notably Wal-Mart, which ended the monthly reporting routine in 2009.

"We believe aligning our sales guidance and reporting with disclosure of our quarterly financial results will create a longer-term focus and provide greater understanding of our sales results in the context of our overall financial performance," John Mulligan, Target's executive vice president and chief financial officer, said yesterday.

There's no doubt that a monthly overview of a retailer's performance only paints part of the whole picture, can be misleading and is a big contributor to the short-term outlook of many analysts and industry-watchers. But there are also those who fear an end to the practice also goes hand-in-hand with a lack of transparency, especially in a tough economic environment where information is power.


BLOG

China cotton call

International fashion brands and retailers are being urged to help build a more resilient cotton supply chain in China if they want to secure supplies of the raw material for the future. But can they ...

BLOG

Are you up to speed on 'The Fit Factor'?

A special event on ‘The Fit Factor – World class wisdom on fashion sizing and fit’ will bring together speakers from Marks & Spencer, Tesco, C&A and Debenhams in the UK next week....

BLOG

US port dipute conclusion nears

A tentative agreement on a new five-year contract has been agreed for some 20,000 dockworkers at 29 US West Coast ports, ending nine months of discussions. The Pacific Maritime Association (PMA) and I...

BLOG

Port disruption could cost $37bn over two years

As the threat of a US West Coast port shutdown looms, analysts already estimate the ongoing disruption could add an eye-watering US$36.9bn to costs over the next 24 months. ...

just-style homepage



Forgot your password?