Adidas and Parley for the Oceans 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole

Adidas and Parley for the Oceans 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole

Adidas has revealed a concept shoe that includes a 3D-printed midsole made from reclaimed ocean waste as part of a collaboration with sustainability group Parley for the Oceans.

Unveiled to coincide with last week's COP21 climate change summit in Paris, the 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole is intended to demonstrate "how the industry can re-think design and contribute to stop ocean plastic pollution," the German sportswear group said.

"The industry can't afford to wait for directions any longer," says Eric Liedtke, Adidas Group executive board member responsible for Global Brands.

"Together with the network of Parley for the Oceans we have started taking action and creating new sustainable materials and innovations for athletes. The 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole stands for how we can set new industry standards if we start questioning the reason to be of what we create.

The concept shoe consists of an upper made with ocean plastic content and a midsole which is 3D printed using recycled polyester and gill net content.

As founding member, Adidas supports Parley for the Oceans in its education and communication efforts, as well as its comprehensive Ocean Plastic Program (A.I.R., Avoid, Intercept, and Redesign) that intends to end plastic pollution of the oceans.

Since the partnership was announced in April 2015, steps taken by Adidas include plans to phase-out the use of plastic bags in its own retail stores by the end of the first quarter of 2016.

It will also end the use of plastic microbeads across all its body care products by the end of this year, and has stopped using plastic bottles for meetings at its headquarters in Herzogenaurach, Germany.

As a precursor to the 3D-printed Ocean Plastic shoe midsole, Adidas and Parley for the Oceans in June showcased a "world first" with a shoe upper made entirely of yarns and filaments reclaimed and recycled from ocean waste and illegal deep-sea gillnets.