Asos will no longer be stocking products containing feathers and down, bone, teeth or shell (including mother-of-pearl), silk, cashmere, and mohair 

 

Silk
Feathers & down
Bone, teeth or shell (including mother-of-pearl)
Cashmere
Mohair

Asos will no longer be stocking products containing feathers and down, bone, teeth or shell (including mother-of-pearl), silk, cashmere, and mohair Silk Feathers & down Bone, teeth or shell (including mother-of-pearl) Cashmere Mohair

UK online fashion retailer Asos has updated its animal welfare policy, and will no longer be stocking products including mohair, cashmere and feathers.

In a statement sent to just-style, Asos said the update aligns its policies for third-party products with those for its own-label Asos.

These include a commitment not to use feathers and down, bone, teeth or shell (including mother-of-pearl). Silk, cashmere and mohair are new additions to the policy.

Asos says no further orders will be placed for products containing these materials and notes its site will be free of these materials by the end of January 2019.

The Asos Animal Welfare Policy applies to all products sold through any of the retailer's websites, including the Asos brand, brands and marketplace traders.

Under the terms of the policy, suppliers must not use any part of vulnerable, endangered, exotic or wild-caught species in their products; not use fur, including Mongolian lamb's fur or rabbit hair (angora); and not use feather/down, bone, horn, shell (including mother of pearl), teeth, mohair, cashmere or silk.

In addition, they must only source certain types of leather, wool and other animal hair as a by-product of the meat industry from suppliers with good animal husbandry.

The retailer also shares a guide to identifying faux fur from real fur on its corporate responsibility web page with advice including examining the hair and backing of the fur and piercing the base with a pin.

Marks & Spencer, Next, Primark and Mango recently committed to ensuring their products are mohair-free following an investigation into the industry in South Africa by animal rights group PETA.

Today (18 June) PETA applauded Asos for "leading the charge for compassion in fashion."

"In response to PETA's campaigns, consumers are changing the face of the industry by demanding that designers and retailers ditch animal-derived materials in favour of cruelty-free alternatives that look great without causing suffering," said PETA director of corporate projects Yvonne Taylor.