Rycroft plans to use her Climate Breakthrough award to catalyse investment in creating low-carbon, commercially viable fibre alternatives that will rapidly shift paper, packaging, and clothing production away from high carbon forests

Rycroft plans to use her Climate Breakthrough award to catalyse investment in creating low-carbon, commercially viable fibre alternatives that will rapidly shift paper, packaging, and clothing production away from high carbon forests

Nicole Rycroft, founder and executive director of Canada-based environmental non-profit Canopy, is to receive a US$3m grant after being named as one of the two recipients of this year's Climate Breakthrough Award.

The accolade is given to extraordinary climate strategists to develop and implement bold new strategies to confront and mitigate the growing climate crisis.

Rycroft and fellow awardee Mohamed Adow of Power Shift Africa, will receive the grant over the next three years as well as tailored support from the Climate Breakthrough Project to bring visionary new strategies from idea to fruition.

Rycroft plans to use her award to catalyse investment in creating low-carbon, commercially viable fibre alternatives that will rapidly shift paper, packaging, and clothing production away from high carbon forests. 

"I'm incredibly honoured to receive this award from Climate Breakthrough to address the challenges we face in this turnaround decade for our planet," she said. "No individual or single company can resolve the planetary crises of climate change and biodiversity loss by themselves. Whole supply chains need to shift – and fast. This award puts wind in our sails to forge Next Generation Solutions to save forests and turn the tide on the climate crisis."

With Canopy, Rycroft has successfully engaged hundreds of the world's leading fashion, publishing, and consumer brands to transform production chains and spur game-changing innovations to safeguard forests around the world. The non-profit has recently transformed the fashion industry's viscose textile supply chain, with more than 50% of global viscose production now ranked at low risk of originating from Ancient and Endangered Forests. 

"The Climate Breakthrough Project finds exceptional leaders capable of pursuing strategies that would affect entire industries or countries and materially change the lives of millions of people. Mohamed and Nicole have both the drive and the rare ability to make change at an immense scale," said Climate Breakthrough Project executive director Savanna Ferguson. "It is truly an honour to support Mohamed and Nicole in building their breakthrough strategies." 

Launched in 2016, the Climate Breakthrough Project has selected eleven outstanding awardees to date, hailing from Australia, China, Canada, Argentina, Vietnam, Indonesia, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Kenya. The awardees represent some of the brightest and most imaginative minds in climate policy, law, finance, forestry, energy, and behavior change.