Customers have taken to the Chinese social media platform Weibo, to voice their anger, with many saying they support Xinjiang cotton and urging a boycott of the brands.

Customers have taken to the Chinese social media platform Weibo, to voice their anger, with many saying they support Xinjiang cotton and urging a boycott of the brands.

Nike and H&M are among brands that have reportedly come under fire in China, with Chinese consumers angered by their position statements on Xinjiang and threatening to boycott the brands.

A statement on Nike's website reads it is "committed to ethical and responsible manufacturing and upholds international labour standards."

"We are concerned about reports of forced labour in, and connected to, the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR). Nike does not source products from the XUAR and we have confirmed with our contract suppliers that they are not using textiles or spun yarn from the region."

H&M has previously said it would not source cotton from Xinjiang and was ending its relationship with a Chinese yarn producer over "forced labour" accusations involving minorities in the region. 

According to media reports, several Chinese actors have since terminated contracts with the brands. Reuters says H&M's official store on Alibaba's Tmall, an e-commerce platform, was not accessible on Wednesday. The official People's Daily reported that searches for H&M products on platforms JD.com and Pinduoduo no longer showed any results.

Customers have also taken to the Chinese social media platform Weibo, to voice their anger, with many saying they support Xinjiang cotton and urging a boycott of the brands.

A spokesperson for H&M said: "At this point we have nothing further to share." Nike did not respond to a request for comment when approached by just-style.

In the last week, Britain, the EU, Canada and the US have slapped sanctions on Chinese officials involved in the mass internment of Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang – a move applauded by footwear, apparel and textile industry bodies.

Earlier this month, the UK Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Committee said in a report that UK firms are unable to guarantee their supply chains are free of Uyghur forced labour and called for tougher anti-modern slavery requirements and measures to force firms to eradicate forced labour in their supply chains.