The second-hand platform Sellpy is taking the next step on its international journey by expanding into two new markets – the Netherlands and Austria

The second-hand platform Sellpy is taking the next step on its international journey by expanding into two new markets – the Netherlands and Austria

Apparel giant H&M Group has launched its second-hand clothing platform Sellpy into the Netherlands and Austria as part of its international expansion.

H&M Group first invested in Sellpy in 2015 through its investment arm CO:LAB. 

Sustainable consumption and the change from a linear to a circular textile economy are an integral part of H&M Group's sustainability work in order to reduce the environmental impact of the entire textile industry. The company wants to make the best possible use of limited resources and to keep garments in circulation for as long as possible. Investments in new business models in the areas of rental, repair, and re-commerce play a vital role in this respect, it says.

Sellpy is the largest online shop and sales service for second-hand items in Sweden. In June 2020 the platform launched in Germany, and for the launch in the Netherlands and Austria, Sellpy has teamed up with H&M Austria and H&M Netherlands to make shopping second-hand even easier.

"We truly believe in the entrepreneurs and team behind Sellpy and their unique circular business model, which perfectly aligns with our vision to become fully circular," says Nanna Andersen, head of CO:LAB H&M Group.

Michael Arnör, CEO of Sellpy, adds: "We see a steady growth in demand for sustainable consumption, where second-hand is a great option. Every garment bought pre-owned saves resources for our planet."

H&M Group has been trying a number of retail models and concepts to try to shake up the fashion industry and reduce its dependency on virgin resources.

Last month, it announced its Arket brand will start renting out childrenswear, while in December the group launched a new membership-based brand that sells apparel and home products at the price they cost to make.

In October it installed the first garment-to-garment recycling system in an H&M store in Sweden, where shoppers can see their old clothes being broken down into fibres and yarns to become the raw material for knitted new clothes.

Its Cos fashion label has also launched an online clothing resale platform where shoppers can buy and sell pre-owned clothing.