• Honduras has become the first member country of the NDC Partnership to develop and finalise a Partnership Plan.
  • The NDC Partnership aims to enhance cooperation so that countries have access to the technical knowledge and financial support they need to achieve large-scale climate and sustainable development goals as quickly and effectively as possible.
  • The three-year plan identifies five priority areas set by the government for implementation of its nationally determined contribution (NDC) under the Paris Agreement.

The Honduras Government has approved a plan to deliver on the country's commitments to advance the Paris Climate Agreement that will serve as the basis for government and partners to work together to achieve Honduras' climate and development goals.

Approval of the plan, which was granted last week by the Presidential Office for Climate Change and the Secretariat of Natural Resources, and the Environment of the Republic of Honduras, sees Honduras become the first member country of the NDC Partnership to develop and finalise a Partnership Plan.

Launched at COP22 in Marrakesh, the NDC Partnership aims to enhance cooperation so that countries have access to the technical knowledge and financial support they need to achieve large-scale climate and sustainable development goals as quickly and effectively as possible.

Honduras was one of the first countries in Latin America to join the NDC Partnership, which has today grown to include 72 member countries, 15 institutional members and three associate members. NDC Partnership members are jointly engaging to support 30 developing countries enhance and implement their NDCs through technical assistance and capacity building.

Honduras' plan - Hoja de Ruta - identifies five priority areas set by the government for implementation of its nationally determined contribution (NDC) under the Paris Agreement, and connects each to available partner and programme resources from across the NDC Partnership and its network.

The five priority areas include: revising the country's NDC; prioritising a list of current and established mitigation and adaptation efforts; developing roadmaps for prioritised actions and signing memoranda of understanding with key partners; establishing a system of monitoring, reporting and evaluation; and strengthening inter-institutional coordination for climate action.

To deliver on these, the plan identifies 21 activities to be carried out over the next three years, including a comprehensive review of the country's NDC, development of a national climate change investment plan, data collection and monitoring, capacity building and public awareness. The Hoja de Ruta is a living document that will be reviewed on a yearly basis to ensure that arising priorities are included and progress made is clearly reflected.

"Honduras is showing real commitment in implementing the Paris Agreement and in aligning its climate goals to the 2030 Agenda. Germany is pleased to support these efforts jointly with other development partners committed to decisive climate and development action," said NDC Partnership co-chair Dr Maria Flachsbarth, parliamentary state secretary to the German Federal Minister for economic cooperation and development.

Honduras had already developed a national climate change strategy that built on its national development plan and complemented a broader environmental policy known as 'Agua, Bosque y Suelo' (Water, Forest and Soil).

Meanwhile, to align its climate and sustainable development agendas, as well as access appropriate financing and support, the country is developing national legislation to codify its climate change ambitions, and will continue existing projects with several NDC Partnership members who support the government in ambitious climate and development action, including the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), UN Environment, the United Nations Development Programme, the UNFCCC Secretariat, the World Bank, the European Commission, among others.

Apparel exports from Honduras currently enjoy duty-free access to the European Union (through the EU-Central America Association Agreement), the United States (through the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement) and Canada (through the Canada-Honduras Free Trade Agreement).

According to the Honduran Manufacturers Association, the major export market for the country's textile and garment industry is the US, with T-shirts the most popular product to be exported to the States, ahead of sweatshirts and cotton shirts.