The report suggests the Mexican apparel industry needs to transition to a circular economy because it is highly inefficient, from both an economic and an environmental perspective.

The report suggests the Mexican apparel industry needs to transition to a circular economy because it is highly inefficient, from both an economic and an environmental perspective.

The Mexican government is being urged to execute policies that can help the apparel industry transition to a circular economy.

A report from the Mexican Center for Environmental Law (CEMDA), supported by the C&A Foundation, suggests the Mexican apparel industry needs to transition to a circular economy because it is "highly inefficient", from both an economic and an environmental perspective.

"It is an industry which wastes vast economic, material, and natural resources, which in turn generates substantial economic losses and huge quantities of waste with untapped potential. At the same time it has a tremendous environmental impact with possible repercussions for human health," writes Dr Juan Carlos Carrillo, CEMDA area coordinator and author of the document. 

Titled 'Promotion of Circular Economy in the Mexican Apparel Industry', the report recommends the Mexican legal framework must effectively protect and regulate natural and economic resources, adding currently, most natural and economic resources are not sufficiently well protected by legislation.

"Nevertheless, the Mexican Constitution provides a substantial legal foundation to support the transition to a circular economy in the apparel industry, with environmental legislation which offers windows of opportunity like the promotion of economic instruments for the implementation of the principle 'whoever pollutes pays,'" argues the report. "Legislation also offers the opportunity to upgrade equipment and test new schemes for generation and supply of clean energy."

The report makes a case for businesses that generate greater economic performance and lower environmental impact. It highlights the effects of the demographic explosion, mounting pressure on natural resources, unchecked production of waste and discharge of polluted water resulting in a growing demand for services that will enable the country to transition to another model of production. 

It includes a series of recommendations that companies and NGOs can apply to accelerate the transition to a circular economy, such as promoting reforms to some of the aforementioned laws, neutralising the carbon footprint of the main companies in the sector, and signing collaboration agreements with various strategic actors. 

"A circular economy is not achieved by decree, but legislation can establish incentives and legal provisions that encourage the transition to a circular economy. The creation of a specific law in that sense can be a determining tool. The current national context presents a window of opportunity and at the same time an urgency to promote the transition towards a circular economy much more harmonious with nature," adds Carrillo.

Click here to access the report.