• Last month, President Donald Trump reimposed economic sanctions on Iran.
  • As a result, a number of leading companies have since suspended activities in Iran, including Nike. 
  • Nike has suspended its kit agreement with the national team, withdrawing its supply of football boots.
If Nike had gone through with supplying the Iranian team with football boots, the company would have faced substantial fines

If Nike had gone through with supplying the Iranian team with football boots, the company would have faced substantial fines

Nike has come under fire again over its role in the FIFA World Cup after the Iranian national team accused the US sporting giant of failing to provide them with football boots just days before the tournament started.

Last month, President Donald Trump reimposed economic sanctions on Iran after withdrawing from the nuclear deal between the Middle East nation and the US' European allies. As such, a number of leading companies are understood to have since suspended activities in Iran.

One of those is Nike, which suspended its kit agreement with the national team just days before Iran were due to start their campaign in Russia, withdrawing its supply of football boots.

If Nike had gone through with supplying the Iranian team with football boots, the company would have faced substantial fines under the US Department of the Treasury's regulations.

A spokesperson for Nike said in a statement: "US sanctions mean that, as a US company, Nike cannot supply shoes to players in the Iranian National team at this time. Sanctions applicable to Nike have been in place for many years and are enforceable by law."

Earlier this week Nike and Adidas were accused of paying poverty wages to supply chain workers who make the football shirts and boots worn by players and supporters.

Between them, the two sportswear giants sponsor 22 out of the 32 teams, with the Nike kit deal for the French national team worth EUR50.5m a year and Adidas sponsoring the German team to the tune of EUR65m per year.

But according to a new 'Foul Play' report from the Clean Clothes Campaign (CCC) and Éthiquesur l'étiquett, shows the share of the costs that ends up in a workers' pocket is now 30% less than in the early 1990s.