Three of Rebel Sport's directors resigned today as the company's overheated share price finally started to cool, shedding nine per cent.

George Ching Wah Goh, Joe Ching Lai Goh, and Daniel Benjamin Besen quit Rebel, which was recently taken over by Harvey Norman.

The Singapore-based Goh brothers had previously attempted to gain control of Rebel while the Melbourne-based Besen family once controlled 19.7 per cent of the sports retailer.

In the last two weeks Rebel shares have almost doubled, driven higher by the prospect of better performance under the controlling hand of Gerry Harvey's Harvey Norman Holdings Ltd.

While the share price gain from 86 cents early last month to a peak of $1.60 on Monday will be delighting Rebel's long-suffering shareholders, who have watched the share price decline steadily over the last two years, it will put a lot of pressure on the group's new managing director.

The Harvey Norman appointee has not yet been named but he will no doubt face intense questioning from Rebel shareholders, keen to learn how he intends to increase earnings and justify the share price.

Harvey Norman so far has given little away about its longer term plans for Rebel but investors obviously believe that the business will benefit from Gerry Harvey's midas touch.

A franchise structure similar to that of Harvey Norman, Australia's largest household goods retailer, is being considered, as well as store expansions and potential acquisitions. Three of Rebel Sport's directors resigned today as the company's overheated share price finally started to cool, shedding nine per cent.

George Ching Wah Goh, Joe Ching Lai Goh, and Daniel Benjamin Besen quit Rebel, which was recently taken over by Harvey Norman.

The Singapore-based Goh brothers had previously attempted to gain control of Rebel while the Melbourne-based Besen family once controlled 19.7 per cent of the sports retailer.

In the last two weeks Rebel shares have almost doubled, driven higher by the prospect of better performance under the controlling hand of Gerry Harvey's Harvey Norman Holdings Ltd.

While the share price gain from 86 cents early last month to a peak of $1.60 on Monday will be delighting Rebel's long-suffering shareholders, who have watched the share price decline steadily over the last two years, it will put a lot of pressure on the group's new managing director.

The Harvey Norman appointee has not yet been named but he will no doubt face intense questioning from Rebel shareholders, keen to learn how he intends to increase earnings and justify the share price.

Harvey Norman so far has given little away about its longer term plans for Rebel but investors obviously believe that the business will benefit from Gerry Harvey's midas touch.

A franchise structure similar to that of Harvey Norman, Australia's largest household goods retailer, is being considered, as well as store expansions and potential acquisitions.