Sustainable activewear brand True Tribe has launched its first line with full supply chain transparency thanks to the use of blockchain.

The company partnered with blockchain-based supply chain traceability solutions provider SUKU to offer consumers full transparency of the garments' complete product journey with its Omni SaaS platform.

The garments, whose lifecycle began as nylon waste such as discarded fishing nets and fabric scraps, were shipped to Browns Fashion in London on 6 November. 

"We aim to set a new standard in conscious fashion, without claiming to be truly "sustainable" because nobody is in fashion," says founder and CEO Alexandre Sundberg. "That being said, we strive to be more conscious about our footprint and to minimise it as much as possible. Today, consumers increasingly support brands that identify better with their values. Thanks to SUKU, True Tribe benefits from the latest blockchain technology to provide full transparency for its products, while connecting on a deeper level with its conscious consumer by revealing its story."

The journey of True Tribe's new line can be traced from the initial plastic waste collection by Healthy Seas in the Mediterranean, Adriatic or North Sea, to the recycling of the nylon by Econyl in Ajdoviscina, Slovenia. This is then regenerated into nylon fabric in Northern Lombardy, Italy, before reaching manufacturing by RIRI in Mendrisio, Switzerland. The product then goes to Pakistan for handcrafting before being shipped to the store or online.

Each garment purchased has a QR code on the hangtag or affixed to the garment. Using the SUKU Scanner app available for iOS or Android devices, consumers can scan the QR code and view the journey of their product, allowing them to learn about its story (through videos and images) and about those who created it.

Additionally, True Tribe says it aims to be a major contributor in helping garment businesses in developing countries such as Pakistan diversify their business models significantly from dependence on fast fashion brands. The company aspires to achieve this by having all its production vertically integrated as to set its own quality standards and working environment.

"We wanted to focus on craftsmanship, so we started with around five pieces and each pair of shorts takes about four hours to make. And it's all made from recycled materials, using nylon from fishing nets and other trash from the ocean."