Blog: Leonie BarrieA vision for the future of fashion

Leonie Barrie | 9 October 2015

Undergarments with built-in sensors that track vital statistics, such as pulse and body temperature; fashions that alter their form, extending and contracting in length as required; and clothing that adapts to changes in temperature. Could this be the vision for fashion in the coming decades?

Well according to ‘Fashion Futurologist’ Dr Sabine Seymour, director of the Fashionable Technology Lab at Parsons The New School for Design in New York, these are just a few of the ways the integration of technology could transform apparel.

Commissioned to look at the wardrobe of the future to mark the launch of the new Huawei smartwatch, Dr Seymour believes personalisation will steer every aspect of our wardrobes.

In years to come, we will be able to change the pattern, colour and even the shape and style of our garments, she says. In fact, we may only need one dress or shirt, downloading new patterns and designs to stay on top of the latest fashions.

Getting hot on public transport or carrying a spare sweater in case of colder weather could also become a thing of the past, as garments will be able to adjust to your body temperature. While the rise of 3D printing techniques and on-demand manufacturing could pave the way for digital cobblers who will create shoes that fit your feet perfectly – and for the rest of your life.

Just like today’s phones, tablets or gaming systems, garments will also become gesture and touch-sensitive. By connecting your garments to other elements of your life, there will be a move from networked devices to networked people and networked spaces. Imagine, smart garments that connect to your car, which will adjust your seat according to personal preferences.

And of course, the future of fashion is sustainable. A major barrier at the moment is the current limitation of battery life. But using alternative energy sources, such as capturing the kinetic energy of a person as they walk, we will be able to create a new form of sustainable fashion, Dr Seymour suggests.

Also delving deeper into smart garments and e-textiles is a new report from just-style, which looks at the opportunities – and potential threats for this fast growing sector. Click on the following link for more details: Wearable technology: The future market potential for smart garments and e-textiles.

BLOG

A confusing mix of sustainable cotton options

There's an undeniable desire on the part of brands around the world to clean up their supply chains, and there's no lack of interest in using more sustainable cotton. But the confusing mix of standard...

BLOG

Have your say – Take part in just-style’s State of Sourcing survey

The global apparel industry and its supply chain is going through a period of unprecedented change. How do you and your colleagues see the outlook for 2018? And what strategies are you likely to be tu...

NEWS

Teijin revises CSR guidelines, targets forced labour

Polymer and textile specialist Teijin Limited has revised its corporate social responsibility (CSR) procurement guidelines in a move that specifies "more detailed efforts" regarding human rights and l...

BLOG

Under Armour's strategic deep dives

Amid signs of a slowdown in its North American business, US sportswear brand Under Armour has made a number of "strategic deep dives" into strategy, supply chain, product, marketing and sales as a pre...

NEWS

Sri Lanka opens first of 150 mini apparel factories

The first of 150 "mini" garment factories has opened in a Sri Lankan village originally set up for displaced people, as part of a US$1.8m national apparel initiative implemented by the Government....

BLOG

Esquel Group on a sustainability mission

Hong Kong-based textile and apparel giant Esquel Group has made it its mission to weave sustainability into its core values, and across a vertical supply chain that spans every step from cotton farmin...

just-style homepage



Forgot your password?