Blog: Leonie BarrieGarment factories boost Bangladesh education

Leonie Barrie | 16 September 2014

The explosive growth of the Bangladeshi ready-made garment industry is more likely to be accompanied by accusations of sweatshop exploitation from labour rights activists than praise for the positive opportunities it brings the sector's largely-women workforce.

But new research suggests the latter is more likely to be true.

The findings from The National Bureau of Economic Research in the US suggest that girls exposed to the garment sector are more likely to delay marriage and childbirth. This is partly because the arrival of garment jobs - which reward literacy and numeracy - are more likely to lead to young girls being enrolled in school; while for older girls there is a greater chance of being employed outside the home in villages close to garment factories.

And in perhaps the most surprising discovery, the paper on 'Manufacturing Growth and the Lives of Bangladeshi Women' says the growth of garment manufacturing has made more of an impact on female education than a large-scale government-backed scheme that offers cash and other incentives to encourage female schooling.

BLOG

VF Corp splitting into two companies

Last week started with news that US apparel giant VF Corp is to spin off the group's denim and outlet businesses into an independent, publicly traded company – in a move that will enable it to focus o...

BLOG

Hong Kong sustainability scoop

We led on just-style last week with a world exclusive scoop on a number of new projects being unveiled in Hong Kong next month – including the first mill being set up in the territory in more than hal...

BLOG

Spotlight on Central America sourcing

A worsening political and social crisis in Nicaragua is having a spillover effect in Central America, where the spectre of rising violence in Guatemala and El Salvador is threatening to undermine appa...

BLOG

Trump trade war may hit garment prices

With US president Donald Trump now threatening to impose tariffs on all US$500bn of goods imported from China, the upcoming trade war will undoubtedly hit garments. But replacing China means replacing...

just-style homepage



Forgot your password?