Blog: Jeans from Nimes

Simon Warburton | 24 August 2010

Extraordinarily, it seems Europeans may have been walking around in denim during the seventeenth century.

The origin of the word has several sources according to which historian you believe, but there certainly appears to have been a French wool and silk material known as 'serge de Nimes,' at that time from which it's not hard to extrapolate the word denim.

The fabric made it over to England where it was either made locally or imported, but the name could - there are many uncertainties - have been anglicised to suit the home market.

In a further twist, it seems sailors from Genoa in northern Italy made their own version of trousers from denim.

It's a short hop from there to 'Genoese' and 'jeans.'

From Italy, France and England, the materials crossed the Atlantic where mill owners apparently made a fabric composed of denim and jean, while the plentiful supply of cotton may have helped too.

There's a highly detailed study of denim's origin here, with as many questions as answers.


BLOG

Why a balanced scorecard drives the best decisions

Among the highlights on just-style last week, we offer advice on how to achieve a balanced scorecard to help supply chain managers make the best decisions around where in the world their garments are ...

BLOG

How social media is forcing apparel brands to think green

Social media, since its evolution, has undoubtedly changed the world as we know it....

BLOG

TAL refocuses and rebalances before growth

By his own admission, Roger Lee, CEO at Hong Kong based apparel giant TAL Group, is an optimist. And it's a trait that has stood him – and the 70-year-old company he leads – in good stead in recent ye...

BLOG

VF Corp splitting into two companies

Last week started with news that US apparel giant VF Corp is to spin off the group's denim and outlet businesses into an independent, publicly traded company – in a move that will enable it to focus o...

just-style homepage



Forgot your password?