Blog: Leonie BarrieM&S mirrors

Leonie Barrie | 19 February 2007

Marks & Spencer uses “distorting” mirrors in its changing rooms to make women look slimmer according to MEP Robert Kilroy-Silk. He’s even raised the issue in the European Parliament, and wants the mirrors to be withdrawn before they are outlawed later this year under new EU consumer protection rules in the Unfair Commercial Practices Directive. M&S of course has denied the allegations, with CEO Stuart Rose dismissing the claim as “complete nonsense”.

But when I discussed the story with colleagues here, the feedback seemed to be along the lines of “I thought everyone did it”. The “it” in question being to tilt or angle mirrors in order to create a flatteringly elongated and slim figure. Surely it’s no different to the practice of “vanity sizing,” where larger garments are labelled with smaller sizes. Or installing down-lighters over the mirrors in a gym to enhance muscle definition. We all know these tricks go on, but even so we’re flattered to look a few pounds thinner or fit into a smaller size – even if it’s not quite the truth.

M&S denies Kilroy mirrors claim


BLOG

Sign up to try new re:source apparel sourcing tool for free

The old saying "Good things come to those who wait" is certainly true for re:source, the new suite of data-driven sourcing tools being developed by the team here at just-style....

BLOG

State of Sourcing Survey 2018 – Final reminder

A final reminder that just-style’s State of Sourcing Survey 2018 will be closing at the end of the week – so if you haven’t already taken part, then now is the time to do so....

BLOG

The challenge of navigating a rapidly-changing landscape

Faced with a paradigm shift in everything from the way products are sold to the tools and technologies that make them, sporting goods brands, retailers and manufacturers are still trying to work out t...

BLOG

A confusing mix of sustainable cotton options

There's an undeniable desire on the part of brands around the world to clean up their supply chains, and there's no lack of interest in using more sustainable cotton. But the confusing mix of standard...

just-style homepage



Forgot your password?