Missguided signs Transparency Pledge, discloses tier 1 factories - Just Style
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Missguided signs Transparency Pledge, discloses tier 1 factories

By Hannah Abdulla 24 Aug 2020

UK fast fashion retailer Missguided has signed the Transparency Pledge, listing its tier 1 manufacturing facilities on its website.

UK fast fashion retailer Missguided has signed the Transparency Pledge, listing its tier 1 manufacturing facilities on its website.

The group joins signatories including River Island, Asos, Clark’s, New Look, Next and Pentland Brands.

The Transparency Pledge was introduced in 2017 by nine trade union federations and human rights organisations, including the Clean Clothes Campaign.

It aims to help the garment industry reach a common minimum standard for supply chain disclosures by getting companies to publish standardised, meaningful information on all factories in the manufacturing phase of their supply chains.

Each company participating in the Transparency Pledge commits to publishing on its website on a regular basis (such as twice a year) a list naming all sites that manufacture its products. The list should provide the following detail in English:

  • The full name of all authorised production units and processing facilities (processing factories include printing, embroidery, laundry, and so on).
  • The site addresses.
  • The parent company of the business at the site.
  • Type of products made (apparel, footwear, home textile, accessories).
  • Worker numbers at each site (by category: less than 1000, 1001 to 5000, 5001 to 10000, more than 10000).

This month Missguided is giving consumers a glimpse behind the scenes of its operations with a new four-part television series.

The Manchester-based firm, launched by Nitin Passi, went from zero turnover to over GBP200m in a year. It was one of 16 fashion retailers including M&S, Primark, Asos and Boohoo, to be quizzed by UK MPs on what they were doing to reduce the environmental and social impacts of the apparel they sell, amid concerns the so-called ‘fast-fashion’ business model encourages over-consumption and generates excessive waste.