Wrangler among 17 new firms to join Jeans Redesign - Just Style
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Wrangler among 17 new firms to join Jeans Redesign

By Michelle Russell 22 Apr 2020

Wrangler and Banana Republic are among 17 companies to have joined the Jeans Redesign project, and will be using its guidelines to make jeans that meet minimum requirements for durability, material health, recyclability, and traceability.

Wrangler among 17 new firms to join Jeans Redesign

Wrangler and Banana Republic are among 17 companies to have joined the Jeans Redesign project, and will be using its guidelines to make jeans that meet minimum requirements for durability, material health, recyclability, and traceability.

Led by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Jeans Redesign was created by the British circular economy charity’s Make Fashion Circular initiative and launched in July of last year. Its aim is to help fashion brands and manufacturers transform the way they produce jeans by tackling waste, pollution, and the use of harmful practices.

The initiative includes guidelines that tackle the issues of waste and pollution associated with denim production, and have an ultimate aim of ensuring jeans last longer, can easily be recycled, and are made in a way that is better for the environment and the health of garment workers.

New brand participants also include Balzac Paris, Icicle, Organic Basics, Seventy + Mochi, Triarchy, and Unspun.

Two garment manufacturers have also joined – Remi Holdings and Tarasima Apparels. Towards the end of 2019, the projected was extended to fabric mills, and additional mills have now signed up. They include Artistic Fabric Mills, Crescent Bahuman, Green Lab, KG Fabriks, Naveena Denim Mills Karachi, Panther Denim, and Tat Fung.

“Despite enormous disruption across the fashion industry caused by the Covid-19 pandemic, it is encouraging to see companies are still committed to keeping the circular economy as a core part of their business models,” says Francois Souchet, lead, Make Fashion Circular. “It shows there is an unstoppable appetite in the industry for a new way to do business, where all our clothes are used for longer, are made from safe and renewable materials, and are made to be made again. As this final group of participants joins the project, we look forward to seeing the first pairs of redesigned jeans on the market in the coming months.”